Butt dad

metalabdesign:

MetaLab TMZ captured this shot of Chris Sparling (MetaLab CFO) as he “spread Christmas cheer” around Victoria.

i hate women sooooo much also drikn blcak coffee on ym porch whikle smokeing cigerattte -charle bukowsky

(via theidiotking)

vicemag:

Corsicans Are Using Bombs to Protest Their Island Paradise 
If you’ve never been to Corsica, you really should. The island, which lies just off the Italian coast, is one of the most beautiful places in the world; it’s covered in snowy mountains, picturesque little towns, and luxurious golden beaches. In certain months, you can ski in the morning and sunbathe in the afternoon; it really is paradise (if combining sunburn and heavy nylon jackets is your idea of paradise). However, perhaps its strongest sell is that it is, officially, the murder capital of Europe.
Last year, I went to Corsica to explore the island’s historical predilection for violence. A week before I touched down in Napoleon Bonaparte airport, two prominent Corsicans—a lawyer named Antoine Sollacaro and Jacques Nasser, head of the chamber of commerce—had been shot dead. I was there to try to figure out who did it (and to make a film about trying to figure out who did it). Murder isn’t shocking in Corsica; there have been more than 110 murders since 2008, the majority of them Mafia-style hits. “At the beginning of the week, we think, It’s strange; we haven’t had a killing yet," Gilles Millet, a local journalist, told me. "This society is soaked in death. You call someone to do something and they say, ‘I can’t. I have a funeral to go to.’ Death is part of [daily] life here."
I asked Gilles who he thought was responsible for the deaths of Sollacaro and Nasser. “Normally everyone knows who’s done the killings, but with Sollacaro and Nasser, we don’t know,” he answered. “Despite everybody usually knowing who did it, there have only been four prosecutions since 2008—out of more than 110 murders. There’s a culture of silence here. Nobody talks, partly out of fear, partly because it’s just not the done thing.”
Continue vicemag:

Corsicans Are Using Bombs to Protest Their Island Paradise 
If you’ve never been to Corsica, you really should. The island, which lies just off the Italian coast, is one of the most beautiful places in the world; it’s covered in snowy mountains, picturesque little towns, and luxurious golden beaches. In certain months, you can ski in the morning and sunbathe in the afternoon; it really is paradise (if combining sunburn and heavy nylon jackets is your idea of paradise). However, perhaps its strongest sell is that it is, officially, the murder capital of Europe.
Last year, I went to Corsica to explore the island’s historical predilection for violence. A week before I touched down in Napoleon Bonaparte airport, two prominent Corsicans—a lawyer named Antoine Sollacaro and Jacques Nasser, head of the chamber of commerce—had been shot dead. I was there to try to figure out who did it (and to make a film about trying to figure out who did it). Murder isn’t shocking in Corsica; there have been more than 110 murders since 2008, the majority of them Mafia-style hits. “At the beginning of the week, we think, It’s strange; we haven’t had a killing yet," Gilles Millet, a local journalist, told me. "This society is soaked in death. You call someone to do something and they say, ‘I can’t. I have a funeral to go to.’ Death is part of [daily] life here."
I asked Gilles who he thought was responsible for the deaths of Sollacaro and Nasser. “Normally everyone knows who’s done the killings, but with Sollacaro and Nasser, we don’t know,” he answered. “Despite everybody usually knowing who did it, there have only been four prosecutions since 2008—out of more than 110 murders. There’s a culture of silence here. Nobody talks, partly out of fear, partly because it’s just not the done thing.”
Continue

vicemag:

Corsicans Are Using Bombs to Protest Their Island Paradise 

If you’ve never been to Corsica, you really should. The island, which lies just off the Italian coast, is one of the most beautiful places in the world; it’s covered in snowy mountains, picturesque little towns, and luxurious golden beaches. In certain months, you can ski in the morning and sunbathe in the afternoon; it really is paradise (if combining sunburn and heavy nylon jackets is your idea of paradise). However, perhaps its strongest sell is that it is, officially, the murder capital of Europe.

Last year, I went to Corsica to explore the island’s historical predilection for violence. A week before I touched down in Napoleon Bonaparte airport, two prominent Corsicans—a lawyer named Antoine Sollacaro and Jacques Nasser, head of the chamber of commerce—had been shot dead. I was there to try to figure out who did it (and to make a film about trying to figure out who did it). Murder isn’t shocking in Corsica; there have been more than 110 murders since 2008, the majority of them Mafia-style hits. “At the beginning of the week, we think, It’s strange; we haven’t had a killing yet," Gilles Millet, a local journalist, told me. "This society is soaked in death. You call someone to do something and they say, ‘I can’t. I have a funeral to go to.’ Death is part of [daily] life here."

I asked Gilles who he thought was responsible for the deaths of Sollacaro and Nasser. “Normally everyone knows who’s done the killings, but with Sollacaro and Nasser, we don’t know,” he answered. “Despite everybody usually knowing who did it, there have only been four prosecutions since 2008—out of more than 110 murders. There’s a culture of silence here. Nobody talks, partly out of fear, partly because it’s just not the done thing.”

Continue

davidkendall:

zeroisaplaceholderzero:

sceneryofme:

The instructions on this turkey said to let it chill in the sink for a couple of hours. I’m not really an expert on turkey cooking so I’m not going to question it too much.

I find this creepy. And humorous.

I’m laughing at this way too hard.

davidkendall:

zeroisaplaceholderzero:

sceneryofme:

The instructions on this turkey said to let it chill in the sink for a couple of hours. I’m not really an expert on turkey cooking so I’m not going to question it too much.

I find this creepy. And humorous.

I’m laughing at this way too hard.

(via madeupmemories)

vgjunk:

The ecstasy of victory and the agony of defeat from Super Soccer, which I wrote all about yesterday.
vgjunk:

The ecstasy of victory and the agony of defeat from Super Soccer, which I wrote all about yesterday.

vgjunk:

The ecstasy of victory and the agony of defeat from Super Soccer, which I wrote all about yesterday.

newyorker:

A cartoon by Tom Toro. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1bPk22Z

(via 131313thavenue)

John Cassavetes, Peter Falk, and Ben Gazzara on The Dick Cavett Show, September 1970. 

This is one of the all-time classics. The first half is total mayhem, and Dick is such a good sport about it. Great secondary source for Husbands.

televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.
televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.
televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.
televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.
televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.
televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.
televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.
televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.
televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.
televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.

televisionwithoutpity:

We really miss the good folks of Pawnee.

(via chilidonut)